DDR@DoubleDogRescue.orgP.O. Box 435, Unionville, Connecticut 06085

VOLUNTEER

Different Ways to Volunteer

Have you considered volunteering but didn’t know where you would fit in? Well, just inquire! All of us were in your place at one time. We can help direct you toward volunteering options. Here are some things to consider:

  • Fostering Dogs
  • Fundraising
  • Writing Grants
  • Attend Adoption Events
  • Screen Applications
  • Meet Us at Transport
  • Updating Our Website
  • Write Articles for Our Blog
  • School Events to Raise Money
  • Educate Children on the Importance of Rescue
  • Photographer Our Dogs
  • Social Media

Pay it Forward. Foster a Dog.

Every time a dog is placed into a foster home, it allows our organization to pull another dog to safety. Fostering a dog is one of the most important and rewarding things you can do to help a shelter dog. It means opening your home and your heart to provide temporary care for a dog, while we look for his or her permanent home. As a foster, you are not only providing a dog with a place to stay, but also teaching him or her what it means to be loved and safe for maybe for the first time. It’s a rewarding experience for all members of the family! Click here to fill out an application. Please email your completed application to ddrfostering@gmail.com.

 

Why Fundraising is Necessary

When we plead for donations, it’s not for our own pockets. Every single Double Dog Rescue Volunteer works for free. We do not get any money from the government or any other political organization. You may think we make our money back when we receive our adoption fee but that is not true. More times than not, we put more money into our dogs than we get back. Approximately $200 of your adoption fee goes toward a reputable transportation company to get your pup to New England safely. Some dogs costs us thousands of dollars, yet we still adopt them out for our normal adoption fee. Double Dog Rescue never turns our back on any dog that requires additional vetting. Morally, we are not built that way. We do this for the greater good. And if a dog isn’t dealt a fair deck, why should he or she be left behind because of negligence. To give you an example: One of our volunteers found a dog on the side of the highway in the middle of the night in the pouring rain. That dog cost us $5,000 and is now in a loving home. Some may wonder why we would sacrifice so much money, money that we don’t have to save one dog. “Saving one dog will not change the world, but surely for that one dog, the world will change forever”

 

We Need a Grant Writer

Writing a grant requires a special skill. It’s a skill that can make or break non-profit organizations. If you or you know someone who encompasses this talent, please contact us. We can use all the help we can get.

 

Frequent Our Adoption Events

Many times we are in need for volunteers to either help advertise our dogs, pick up dogs from their foster homes so they can attend the event, tend to our tables, or even sell our t-shirts. Inquire how you can help. Even if it’s occasionally!

 

Screen Applications

Work with our very own, Michelle Desiano, on the best practices to screening applications. Yes, it’s a skill! It’s imperative that we place our dogs into safe, appropriate, and loving homes. You will talk one-on-one with the potential adopter and facilitate home visits.

 

Join Us at Transport

Watch our once homeless and unwanted dogs walk off the transport truck to freedom. Occasionally we need volunteers to pick up the dogs at transport and bring them to their foster homes. Or, you can go and take photos. It’s truly heartwarming to watch these innocent creatures exit the truck into their new life.

 

Update Our Website

If you or you know someone else who knows WordPress, we could use the help updating our website. It’s important for us to refresh our website both visually and with content. We can supply you with the copy and art. All you would need to do is update our WordPress site!

 

Extra! Extra! Calling All Bloggers

If you have good writing skills, why not put them to good use by writing articles for our blog! The more traffic driven to our website, it increases our existence in the digital word. Plus. Dog loves enjoy reading about tips and tricks that they were not aware of.

 

Educating Kids the Importance of Compassion

We have to start with kids! Go to your kids school and discuss the importance of rescuing animals. Many of our Volunteers frequent their local dogs parks. When they see children with their own dog, they ask them questions and tell them about how much Double Dog has done to rescue dogs. Watching their faces light up in awe is such a reward. In turn, they will spread the word to their friends.

 

Schools That Raise Money for Non-Profits

We always encourage our young ones to get involved helping our dogs. Educating them at a young age not only teaches them compassion, but it builds integrity, self-esteem and awareness. Schools offer bake sales and other events to raise money for non-profits. Some kids spearhead their own fundraisers! Some of which are, making bracelets, painting canvases of dogs, and offering lemonade stands. What touches us most is when a child asks for donations for our dogs instead of receiving a present. We aren’t suggesting this, it’s just something then never occurred to us and it has happened so many times. Talk about a selfless act!

 

Say “Cheese”

We have a few volunteers who help us take photos of our dogs at events and transport. Sometimes they can’t always make it. We could also use photographers for fundraising. In the past we have had dogs have their photos taken with Santa, the Easter Bunny, or even just family portraits!

 

Social Media Experts

Are you savvy with Pinterest, Titter, or Instagram? Well, we could sure use your help. We’d like to enhance our social media exposure outside of Facebook. It would be great if someone could help us out with that. Even better if you know best practices in the industry.

 

 

 

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